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They show kindness to the dwarf throughout the story even though he was not nice to them. You have torn my thin little coat all to shreds, useless, awkward hussies that you are! This does not deter the girls from their kind-heartedness and helping anyone in need. This is an excellent example of an adult-centered trait. Snow-white and Rose-red are perfect symbols of the nostalgic childhood images who end up being rewarded for their good nature and kind hearts.

The authors are showing that if a child is obedient and good then they will surely receive a reward in the end. There are many attributes of an adult-centered text that this story has which contributes to the conservative nature of the text. This text is extremely conservative and adult-centered in various ways. This fairytale encompasses some of the topics we have discussed in class. It not only is incredibly child centered, but it also is progressive. The Grimm brothers depicted both Hansel and Grethel as smart, capable people. As Hansel dropped pebble after pebble on the road to help them find their way home, the wife noticed that he consistently looked back at the house.

Therefore, his plan worked and he and his sister are able to find their way home after being left in the woods. By, having the ability to outsmart the adults, Hansel proved to have a great amount of agency. He not only had the courage to secretly plot against them, but also managed to trick them into believing he was just a childish boy fantasizing about his cat. His lie about the cat is significant because it shows that he understands adults have these assumptions that children are childlike in their thinking.


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Grethel also had her moment of greatness when she tricked the witch. Smartly, Grethel told the old witch she did not understand how to get in the oven. Ultimately, the witch was engulfed in flames resulting in her ruin. Like Hansel, Grethel is depicted as a stronger, smarter character than the adults, especially the witch, within this fairytale. Both children easily trick the adults. In addition, they have the power to find their way through the woods at the end of the story with no pebbles or bread to guide them.

The two children truly have an enormous amount of agency as they not only can outsmart the adults, but also can manipulate nature to help them. It is as if Hansel and Grethel gain more confidence, and agency as they manipulate and conquer every obstacle crossing their path.

Another example of why this text is child-centered is how the adults are depicted. First, it is important to note that it is only the children who have names. In addition, the adults are all portrayed as selfish, weak, and evil. The wild animals would soon come and tear them to pieces!

Then we must all four die of hunger, thou mayest as well plane the planks for our coffins. The father barely stood up for his children, and let his wife send them to their deaths. He merely gave into her, even though it was clear that he loved his children dearly. Although he is a good character, he has no power to stand up for what he believed and felt strongly for. Therefore, it is apparent, that all three adults in this story are perceived as evil or weak, making this a truly child-centered text. She believed that they could never locate their way out of the woods because they were mere children, and would have no adult to guide them.

However, they break these assumptions by finding their way through the forest not once, but twice. This is extremely progressive, because it challenges some of the stereotypical assumptions about childhood. Children are often thought of as very dependent on their parents and innocent; however, Hansel and Grethel clearly do not need their parents to find their way.

In fact, the children not only found their way through the confusing woods and saved themselves from the horrid witch, but they also saved their father. In a more conservative text the father would have been the savior; however, it is Hansel and Grethel who hold all the power and save the day. It challenges assumptions about children, and gives children a great amount of agency.

Hansel and Grethel are depicted as capable strong characters, whereas the adults are seen as evil and weak. The children also reject the norms of childhood that suggest life for a child is simple and fun, as they understand their lives are complex, and they work hard to control the situations around them.

By there same token, there are certain things that are expected of a girl to maintain her societal femininity. From a young age, we are lead to believe that boys are the dominant, more powerful sex. Females are portrayed as care takers and are often seen as being more compassionate and caring then males are.

Men are expected to rougher and less sensitive. The men are expected to work hard to bring home money to support their families. Females are often portrayed as being more in touch with their emotions. None of these ideas applies to any one person any more so then do personality traits, but our society interpellates these ideas into our minds every minute of every day. The following passage is from my paper on the Goonies , in which I highlight some examples of the interpellation typical female and male roles in this movie.

The boys seem to be portrayed in the usual ways, as being mischievous and thrill seeking, while the girls are shown as weak and scared. The oldest girl, Andy, seems more concerned with her crush throughout the movie then she does with finding the gold and taking an active role in the adventure. There is a point in the movie where Mikey tells Andy that she may want to hold his hand because it was dark up ahead and it may be dangerous. This is another example of the girls and the guys being put into common roles that society has created for them.

As we have been told since we were young children through fairy tales and everyday life, men are supposed to take care of females and be there to protect them. This statement reaffirms the idea of interpellation of typical male and female roles in this film. The developers son is driving a convertible and wearing his letter jacket and has two girls in his car, while Brent is wearing ratty old sweats and is riding his little brothers bike. Interpellation is shown in the idea that the rich kids are cool and popular, while the poor kids are unpopular and outcasts.

At the end of the movie, when the family realizes they have enough money to save their home, they come together and hug each other and really show affection towards each other for the first time in the movie. Again, interpellation is shown in that money and material things bring happiness. Children who are born into wealth and privilege are showcased in reality television and documentaries, further rubbing our noses in the fact that there are parents who can provide for their children in ways that you or I could never imagine from a material standpoint.

Our culture seems to go out of its way to display this quality, to make those who have more feel better about themselves and those who have less feel worse. I think this reoccurring theme is strong in the Goonies. As described in the excerpt Mikeys family is portrayed as poor and unhappy. The rich family holds the happiness of the poor family in its hands. The rich family has all of the agency while the poor family has none. Like in our society, the poor are at the mercy of the rich.

They want to keep power in the hands of those who have always had it, and usually on of the only ways to do that is to interpellate society to believe that that is where the power and authority belong in the first place. In fact, I always hated princesses and pink for that matter. Below are some detailed examples of interpellation that I found in this particular version of the story:.

He is stopped along the way by a strange old man. The picture of the old man in this story is interesting because the old man is dressed rather uniquely. I think that this shows interpellation because it shows that strange people dress differently from normal people. In the United States , we assert ourselves and are identity at first impression, based solely on our clothing.

Like I said in the paper, distinctions between strange and normal are made all of the time based on clothing. If I were to dread lock my hair, someone might look at me and think I was perhaps dirty or unprofessional, when my goal is doing so was only to embrace a low maintenance lifestyle. We make assumptions like the previous constantly, based on appearance alone. We are interpellated to believe that we must dress certain ways for certain occasions.

After Jack climbs the beanstalk, he finds the giants wife, who just returned from picking flowers. He asks her for something to eat and she says that she will make him something to eat, but that they must be fast because her husband gets home soon. She is patiently waiting for her husband to get home and is picking flowers to pass the time and she is the one who does all of the cooking for her husband. The wife also seems to be at the mercy of her husband. In the story she invites Jack inside but warns him that her husband likes to eat little boys.

Interpellation is shown in the idea that the giant has the control over his wife and her opinion on the welfare of Jack is irrelevant to him. As soon as the giant gets home, he demands dinner and his wife, who has already had it prepared, brings it to him right away. The female giant seems to act like a servant to her husband; throughout the story he demands things and she brings them for him right away.

It is also interesting that the husband is only concerned with eating, sleeping and money, which is a very typical depiction of males. Kingdom Hearts as a Child-Centered Text. In the Playstation 2 game Kingdom Hearts , players are introduced to a young boy named Sora who is thrown into a struggle to save not one, but multiple worlds from a mysterious force known as the Heartless.

Sora finds himself suddenly wielding a magical weapon called the Keyblade , which just happens to be the only thing that can fight the Heartless, and an artifact that Donald Duck and Goofy have been ordered by Mickey Mouse to find. Sora has a different mission- he is looking for his two best friends, Riku and Kairi , who disappeared when his world was destroyed by the Heartless. Together, Sora , Donald and Goofy venture to different worlds, meet many other Disney characters, and battle the Heartless in hopes of restoring balance to the worlds.

At first, Kingdom Hearts appears to be a light fairy-tale about good fighting evil, but it soon becomes apparent that Sora and childlike characters like Donald and Goofy are dealing with issues not typically found in adult-centered texts, and more importantly, they are doing it without the aid of just, authoritative adults. The adults in Kingdom Hearts are a far cry from the knowledgeable, caring, strong individuals typically found in adult-centered texts.

The first major group of adults consists of the villains from various Disney movies who are working together with the Heartless to take over their worlds. This group includes such characters as Jafar , Captain Hook and Maleficent, all of which are most likely already infamous to the player for their deeds in their respective films.

The game presents them as completely irredeemable- they are evil, corrupt, and will stop at nothing to achieve their goals, even if it means dealing with the mysterious Heartless. Of course, one by one their plans backfire and they are either defeated by Sora or betrayed by the Heartless, which is a rather adult-centered way of dealing with bad adults.

However, the second major group of adults makes up for this. These characters are the heroes that the villains originally battled- Aladdin, Tarzan and Jack Skellington , for example. Upon arriving in Halloween Town , for example, Sora , Donald and Goofy are shocked to see that Jack has recruited the Heartless in the annual Halloween festival. In addition to these two groups of adults, Kingdom Hearts features adults that appear to be in positions of authority, but in reality have little or no power over children.

In the world of The Little Mermaid , King Triton has lost much of his control over Ariel- the scene where he originally destroys all of her treasures becomes much less devastating in the game, where he only destroys an item that is later revealed to be useless anyway.

His mother is heard once at the beginning of the game, where she calls him for dinner, but the same exact scene shows Sora sneaking out of the house through his bedroom window. Mickey Mouse is the closest thing to a central authority figure the game has because he is the main reason why Donald and Goofy are exploring the worlds, and thus, the reason why Sora is brought along. However, it is interesting to note that Mickey is more of a childlike character than an adult, due to his being an animal.

In addition to Mickey Mouse, Donald and Goofy are also very childlike. Donald still has a short temper and is very annoyed at the idea of the legendary Keyblade Master being a kid. He and Sora do not get along very well, but their arguments are small and childish, and they usually make amends shortly after. Goofy tries hard to be the mediator between the two, but he usually ends up doing what Donald tells him to avoid causing more trouble. However, Goofy soon realizes that Sora is too good a friend to just abandon and has a change of heart.

Sora himself also has a huge amount of agency, possibly more than anyone else in the game. His agency is represented by the Keyblade , which is regarded as a symbol of great power in every world he visits. When he loses it, he can only get it back by realizing that its strength comes from his heart. Sora receives the Keyblade by resisting the Heartless when his world is destroyed- it recognizes that he is strong and good-hearted. When he learns of his destiny as the Keyblade Master, he embraces it rather than running from such a huge responsibility, if only because he hopes that it will lead him to his missing friends.

However, he realizes that he is being used to hurt his friends and fights back. In an attempt to atone for the things he did while working for the villains, Riku offers to help Sora seal off the Heartless, but this act will leave him trapped with the Heartless as a result. Sora is distressed at the thought of being separated again, but Riku insists, and his confidence in Sora allows them to seal away the Heartless. Kingdom Hearts still has some elements common to adult-centered texts, one of which is the mostly conservative plot.

Sora is trying to restore the norm instead of change it, and the forces trying to cause change and disrupt the balance are the Heartless and the Disney villains. Sora also learns lessons throughout the game by interacting with the various characters within the Disney worlds.

The lessons are highly didactic and Sora ultimately accepts them, but at the end of the game, it is clear to the player that he is still given the choice of acknowledging them or not. Finally, there is the question of what the Heartless truly represent. There is no doubt that the Heartless are pure evil- they corrupt everything they touch and bring out the very worst in anyone who deals with them.

Then again, the Heartless could also represent a more child-centered view- that children have the ability to resist evil. Sora wields the Keyblade , which is the only weapon that can truly stop the Heartless, and he gains it by resisting the darkness. Meanwhile, Riku , who is a few years older than Sora and therefore less childlike, willingly joins the Heartless. Also, the adults who indulge in the evil perpetrated by the Heartless end up being defeated, or worse, completely swallowed by the darkness. However, the game makes it clear that it is not childlike innocence that allows Sora , Donald and Goofy to effectively fight the Heartless- as a child-centered theme, the Heartless represent a false sense of maturity and power that can only be overcome by a strong sense of right and wrong, friendship, and courageousness, which the trio have gained by working together.

Riku also realizes this after being used by the Heartless, and therefore he also gains the ability to fight them. While Kingdom Hearts features didactic lessons and a conservative storyline, the focus of the game lies with the childlike characters. Sora has only enlisted himself in the fight against the Heartless because he hopes it will lead him to his friends. The Disney characters he meets throughout his journey act more childlike than he does, and even Mickey Mouse, the central authority figure of the game, is childlike.

While there are some adult-centric ideas present in Kingdom Hearts , the game is mostly a child-centered text because the children and childlike characters act with a great amount of agency and deal with things that are typically not associated with common assumptions about childhood, while adult figures are either powerless, bad, or flawed and complicated themselves. The simple story relates an incident of a flood that enables Princess Molly the Messy, a member of a tidy and neat royal family, to rescue her them through her messiness, and ultimately shows the value of her individuality.

The main area where Tyler strays from classic patterns involves the message of the story. In fact, Tyler even suggests that messiness may not only come in handy, but it could also be a means of rescue. Thus, Molly never disobeys her parents because a specific request, which she could obey, is never present.

In essence, Tyler portrays Molly as innocent and kindhearted, sharing her space and using all she has for good, even though her disorderly ways would typically be naughty behavior. Tyler spins a web of opposites, showing innocence in a slovenly room. Clearly, a messy room relates almost universally to all children who might enjoy a tale about this quality.

However, Tyler treats messiness much differently than many parents would by showing its benefits, not its repulsiveness. Most children posses messiness seemingly inherently and would revel in a book about their way of life. Tyler provides a character to identify with, no matter who the young reader is. Tumble Tower represents an interesting blend of standard formats and counter-culture messages.

Though the story is didactic, its message teaches the individuality of personality in children. Even though the movie is one of the most popular Disney films it shows some underlying examples of interpellation. There are also some issues of agency that display the intricate way that Mary Poppins changes the degree of agency in the household. When watching the film and trying to figure out who has agency over whom it seemed difficult because of the fact that there are several characters that are involved. When the film begins everything seems to be typical when it comes to agency. Banks is the man of the house and tells everyone what to do and everyone in return obeys him.

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The first song Mr. Banks sings is about how proud he was of how orderly his life was. He felt that it was his duty to give commands and do everything in the exact order that they were supposed to be done in a stereotypical sense. It seemed that all was in order and that order was given by Mr. Banks alone. The minute that Mary Poppins comes into their door the agency is taken away from Mr. Banks immediately. Even though he has no idea that he no longer has power because of the fact that Mary Poppins is wise enough to know that if she lets him think that he tells her what to do and that he comes up with all of the ideas then he will never know.

This does create a slight fight for power between Mr. Banks and Mary Poppins because Mary always has to stay one step ahead of Mr. Banks and he is always a very close step behind her. When the dynamics of the household become so happy and seemingly perfect Mr. Banks is angry because he can almost feel himself losing his power which is what causes him to become so bossy. When things involve Jane and Michael they are not directly given any agency but seems to be able to take some of the agency away in certain circumstances. Anytime they seemed to disobey an adult it was either a misunderstanding or they were quickly turned around.

The only obvious time that agency was displayed by the children was when Michael was at the bank and he was adamant that his money go to feeding the birds instead of in the bank. When Mary, Bert and the children jumped into the picture they were able to go out on their own for awhile without supervision but that would be the person with the agency allowing them to have a little leeway.

Mary gave them chances to be their own judge but she was always there to pull them back and take over when things were out of hand.


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  • She allowed agency to be taken when there was a lesson to be taught in letting them go. After Mary has accomplished what she came to do, which would be to show the family how to be a family and how to have fun and take the time they have and cherish it, she allowed the agency to be taken back by Mr.

    It was very interesting to see how manipulative Mary could be when dealing with people and getting her way; it was apparent that she was an expert at stealing agency from others. This film drips with interpellation even though it is not always obvious. The first example that comes up is the fact that Mr. Banks has the final say in everything and that is played out as if it should be that way.

    I found it ironic that the spunk Mrs. Banks had when Mr. Banks was not around was astounding but that changed as soon as he enters the picture. Banks is home she is extremely submissive. For example when she is leaving the house to go to a protest Mr. Though there may be some sarcasm meant by the writers of the film it still says to society that it is okay to have your own opinions as a women but when it comes to her husband she better be obedient and believe what he says. Banks opinions are totally contradictory to things that Mr.

    Banks says but when she talks to him she agrees with everything he says. Her description is rosy cheeks, never cross or cheery disposition, she is thin, and this is what most would consider very ladylike as well; this all points to what women are continuously told to be. When Mary, Bert and the children are in the painting and they get on Merry-go-round horses Mary rode the lavender one with a smug ladylike look on its face, Jane rode the pink one with long eyelashes, Michael rode the blue one with slit eyes and Bert rode the orange one.

    Even though this was a small detail of the movie it still displays what girls and boys should be like and what colors they should wear. When the children went to the bank with their father the whole trip was centered on Michael, even though Jane went along he was the one that was supposed to invest his money and see what his dad does. The thought of Jane investing her money in the bank was never even thought of or even the idea that she had any money. Men are supposed to take care of all the money and be the ones that earn it and that is what the whole bank trip reinforced. Michael always seems to be the one taking the action, in the end when they go fly a kite Michael is the one flying it with his father and Jane and Mrs.

    Banks are in the background watching. The film interpellates us to think that the men are supposed to be the ones acting on their feelings and saving people and even thinking. The only dominant role that a women plays in the film are the cook, maid and nanny; Mary Poppins is a controversial character because of her ability to do as she pleases even around men but she still plays right into the stereotype that the male should be in the dominant seat.

    The film does seem to have a hint of sarcasm about the role of the women as stated earlier but in the end it seems to be just a bit of humor that does not disprove the interpellation. Things seem to all fall into the stereotypical place that society likes for them to be in both in terms of agency and interpellation. It seems as if in this case interpellation coincides with agency which seems to put the happy ending to the movie.

    The movie is about a colony of ants that spends most of its time gathering grain for the grasshoppers, who intimidate and frighten them into doing it. It leaves the ants little time to gather food for themselves before the rainy season begins, but it is a part of their culture, and so they continue to repeat the tradition year after year. In the beginning of the movie, the ants are preparing their yearly offering when it is ruined by Flik , an ant in the colony. The grasshoppers are very angry and demand that they gather twice the amount of food before the last leaf falls.

    He finds what he thinks are warrior bugs, but are actually circus bugs, who in turn think that Flik is a talent scout. They travel back with him to the colony, impress everyone, and then discover their real purpose for being there. They end up staying however, and the ants come up with a plan to keep away the grasshoppers—they make a bird to scare them. They all work together, but in the end their plan is foiled.

    Flik , however, stands up for the colony, the grasshoppers are scared away, and the head grasshopper, Hopper, gets eaten by a bird. In the end the ants no longer have to gather food for the grasshoppers—only themselves. The first character I wanted to talk about that demonstrates resistance of interpellation is Flik. The main problem is that through trying to make things better for the colony, he brings in new ideas that the colony is not willing to accept.

    You wanna help us build this thing, then get rid of that machine, get back in line, and pick grain like everyone else! He is almost repressively interpellated , in that the other ants try to force him to act like everyone else. An example of this is while the ants are in line to deposit their grains onto the pile; a leaf falls on the path of the line, and the ant it falls in front of freaks out. When that is impossible, they flip out. Flik resists interpellation, which also provides him with agency. There are several examples of this throughout the movie, one of which is the way that he stands up to Hopper.

    In this way, Flik gains agency because he acts on behalf of himself and admits that he resisted interpellation purposefully. Another example of Flik gaining agency is when he left the colony. The colony did not like that someone tried to be different than what was expected of them, and were willing to punish Flik because of it—another example of how their interpellation is repressive.

    Flik , however, decides to go off on his own to try again to help his colony. He acts as a free agent in that sense—it was his idea to leave, although he did have to get permission. Another resister of interpellation is the ladybug. He usually gets pretty angry when this happens, and tries to inform the other bugs that he is a male and being a ladybug does not necessarily make him a lady.

    In the end, however, he becomes more feminine, due to his affiliation with the Blueberries. In contrast is Heimlich, the caterpillar who desperately wants to fit in with his species by growing wings and becoming a butterfly. However, he is incredibly happy because as a caterpillar, he wanted so badly to go through the same transformation that other caterpillars go through—due to ideological interpellation.

    In this way, Heimlich is a foil for the ladybug—they represent opposing desires and goals. Additionally, Dot is a marked contrast to her sister, Atta. Dot is very rebellious and attempts to gain agency in a few ways, the first of which is trying to use her wings to fly before they were fully grown. However, her desire to fly could also be attributed to interpellation—she wants to be able to do what everyone else is able to. But Dot also demonstrates agency by leading the Blueberries into hiding from the grasshoppers when they come to collect their grain at the end of the season.

    She goes on her own to find Flik to bring him back and help the rest of the colony—and this time she is able to fly. Her ability to fly and the complete growth of her wings can be interpreted as a symbol of her independence and power. When she finds Flik , she gives him a rock to represent a seed to remind him of what he told her in the beginning of the movie: she may be just a small seed, but she will one day grow into a big, strong tree and be able to do anything. So Dot, the little girl, teaches Flik , the young man, a lesson, which helps her to gain agency.

    Atta is ideologically interpellated to believe that she must be infallible in order to govern the colony. She seems very rule-oriented and unable to function unless she knows what it is she is expected to do. She seems to be unable to simply observe a situation and come up with an answer—she has to know what was done in the past, what her mother did, etc. However, by the end of the movie, Atta gains agency, in that she is crowned as Queen by her mother, who apparently decides that she is ready. Atta also resists interpellation—she saves Flik by grabbing him and flying off with him.

    He tells her to fly away from the ant hill while it is raining which is very dangerous for the ants , and she responds that the ant hill is the other way. Some of the characters in the movie resisted interpellation in a healthy way, and some were interpellated in a healthy way, but some were also interpellated in an unhealthy way. Meta-textual sources call attention to themselves as a created thing by being self-referential, breaking the fourth wall or defamiliarizing their audience.

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    This causes the source, whether it is television, movies or books to recognize itself as what it is, and for the audience to also realize that they are indeed only an audience and are not actually a part of what they are witnessing. Meta-textual sources do not offer the experience in which one gets lost in what they are watching or reading, instead it causes the audience to do the opposite and remember exactly what it is that they are doing. This paper will reflect some of these meta-textual ideas by giving examples of ways these ideas can be portrayed.

    I loved the close nit family that they shared and when watching it nearly every night on television after school, I began to feel a part of it as well. Those girls were my sisters and the experiences they went through seemed to always be exactly what I was feeling as well. Sitting in the middle of my living room floor I would be completely engrossed in what was happening on TV that I would not even remember where I actually was.

    The final episode was tragic because it seemed like my family was leaving me forever; however, that alone was not enough but the editor of the series probably made the biggest mistake it ever could. Once the episode was over, without any commercial interruptions, the cast lined up across the kitchen floor and took a bow and I heard the roar of an audience. The camera paneled up, through the fourth wall of the set and showed me what I never knew had existed, because there, giving a standing ovation, were tons of fans of the show watching as the cast took their final bow.

    Not once in any episode had I ever wondered why I had never seen that fourth wall of the kitchen, bedroom, living room or garage, instead it seemed like I was actually there in the midst of it all with the fourth wall behind me. Finding out that Full House was actually a television show and that Michelle, Stephanie and DJ were all actors and were not related to each other or me in any way completely broke my heart, and I still have not forgotten that feeling to this day.

    Breaking the fourth wall completely ruins the feeling of getting lost in the episode, and takes away all closeness the audience ever shared with the cast. In the movie Monty-Python and the Holy Grail, the cast chooses to act without the use of many props, or the ones that you would typically expect, and also the plot and scene location is oddly chosen; yet, the movie gives off the appearance that all of this is taking place during medieval times.

    The main character is acting as if he is the King, and goes throughout the countryside, not on horseback but followed by his sidekick with clinking coconuts, claiming that he needs to find the Holy Grail. Watching throughout the entire movie the audience is thinking that they have been taken back in time, until the very end when cop cars pull up to the actors, get out and start arresting them. The director closes the scene and all of the extra characters in the background take a knee and rest while the cops are asking what is going on.

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    The main character claims that they are just filming a movie, however the cops still shut down their attempts anyway. This is a prime example of a movie being self-referential because it dedicated an entire scene to show the audience that they are not back in medieval times, but are actually in the rural countryside of modern day Europe.

    The first scary movie that I ever saw was Scream when I was about eleven years old. I had never been more terrified in my life, and the first time I saw little through cracked fingers over my face. But as I continued to watch it, literally over ten times, and as the sequels came out they became my favorite and always promised a good scare. Then during the first few years of high school, stupid comedies began to be the biggest blockbuster hits and with these came the release of Scary Movie. At first it did not seem appealing to me, but eventually I was dragged by one of my friends and this comedy brought about an entire new meaning to my favorite scary movie series.

    Seeing that goofy looking scream mask with the tongue sticking out, and watching the horrible acting of a girl running from the killer completely defamiliarized me to the movies that I loved most. I wish I had never seen those movies because then I would still be able to sit down and watch them and get a good scare every now and then. If one knows that what they are going to be seeing is funny, fictional and is established in order to provide them with a good laugh, then I feel that meta-textual sources are capable of providing great entertainment for the people that experience it.

    The book does have an emotionally powerful story that shows a tree sacrificing itself over the years to make the boy happy. In many ways the tree is like the boys mother, who would sacrifice anything for their child just to bring them happiness. The tree having human qualities, such as speech and the ability to feel emotions, gives the book a fantasy aspect which is one of the common assumptions found by Nodelman.

    The tree being represented as a mother figure is used to challenge many of the common assumptions. The tree starts out loving the boy for no apparent reason besides he is there like a mother would love a newborn baby. As a child the boy plays all the time with the tree and as he grows up he begins to only come to the tree when he wants something.

    The tree acts as an old woman being visited by her son in a retirement home, asking the boy to spend time with it by climbing up the trunk and swinging from the vines, only to have him wanting material objects. Instead of money and the old family house, the boy takes the trees precious apples and the majority of the trees body to build a house and a boat. The ending is bittersweet for the tree which gets what it wanted all along, to just be with the boy, but the tree has been reduced to an old stump because of him.

    The tree is like an old woman who sacrificed her medication money for their son and is dying because of it, but still feels happiness to have that same son come and visit them.

    fact sheet

    The ambiguous ending does challenge the assumption of teaching valuable lessons about life in a fun way. I am very tired. The image of the only human character in the book being shown right before death is definitely not a typical happily ever after ending. The two characters in The Giving Tree rely on each for different things. The Tree relies on the boy for his happiness and company, while the Boy relies on the Tree for the different objects it can provide him.

    The two are on common grounds at the end when the only thing the Tree can offer the boy is a seat and its company, and all the boy wants is a place to sit. The Boy does love the tree, but smiles while carving his name into the tree which would hurt a living emotional creature such as the tree. The trees desperation for love seems rather pathetic as it willing gives up its body to him, also the fact that everything it gives up was its own idea and not the Boys adds to her desperation.

    A positive role model would be confident and show dignity, which are two qualities that neither of these characters posses. At the start of the story when the Boy is actually a boy, he seems like more of a role model possessing innocent qualities much like the children reading the book would contain.

    The child innocence the boy possessed is the only stage of the Boys life any child could truly understand. The desires for a wife and a home are things which children never desire. But they are aware of these things from interacting with the adults in their life, just not able to fully comprehend the need for such grown up things.

    A child could most likely understand the Tree and its need to make the Boy happy since many children would do anything to make their parents happy. One of the most disturbing ways that the Tree tries to make the boy happy is when it tells him to cut it down so he can make a boat out of it. This leaves the tree as nothing more but a stump, which is what is left of a tree after it was chopped down and killed. This makes the image of the Boy carrying away the tree seem frightening because its true that the branches and the apples could be seen as part of its body but taking away its trunk seems like taking away its whole body, leaving its soul in the stump.

    So, cutting the tree down is the emotional equivalent of cutting a character in half and could be a frightening image to many children. The theme is evident in the story and should be realized by most children after multiple readings and talks with their parents. When I was little, there was no public library where I lived. A service was started when I was five years old called The Bookmobile that would come to our county every three weeks. It would park at specific sights and people could come and check out books or read magazines.

    To this day, I vividly remember the first book I ever checked out—Dr. I was absolutely fascinated by the book. I remember how shiny and new it was compared to the Bible story books and fairy tale books that I had, and how it was filled with wild and wacky looking creatures. I read it over and over and tried my best to see how fast and far I could read the different sections without taking a breath.

    I like green eggs and ham! However, if you were searching for a book that reinforced the typical case prototype which Perry Nodelman wrote about, then this book could be the poster child for this type of book. In this book, if you count the hyphenated name of the character Sam-I-Am, there are only two words in the entire book that are larger than five letters long. The other word is anywhere, which like Sam-I-Am, can be separated into words of less than five letters.

    Not only the words are simple, but the illustrations are simple, being a few steps above a line drawing. The creatures are extremely imaginative, but even though they are fantastic, they are not in any way threatening, for threatening and scary creatures are a no-no in the typical case prototype. I could not, would not, with a fox. It also reinforces the assumptions that children have short attention spans and learning must be made fun.

    For instance, while the book itself is fairly long for a picture book, most of the pages contain little text. Also the rhyming, rhythmic nature of the words encourages young readers to make a game of the rhymes, just as I did as a child. Green Eggs and Ham also supports the contention that books should teach a lesson or moral. This lesson is also not given as a directive that should be obeyed without question. And you may like them. It is also very adult centered in that the book has a happy ending.

    This friendship is evidenced by a change in attitude and body language, and most obviously by his putting his arm around Sam-I-Am at the end of the book It does deviate, however, from the traditional child and adult roles in some ways. One way it does this is in the characteristics of the two main characters. The larger character is also childlike because of his very stubbornness, which in the assumptions Nodelman wrote about could be considered the opposite of maturity and adulthood. It is possible this role reversal was done as a devise to stress how unreasonable it is to act in this way.

    Being stubborn and unreasonable is the opposite of how an adult would act, so therefore this type of behavior is shown to be even more undesirable and incorrect and children should strive to behave like Sam-I-Am. While this book is in most ways a typical case prototype, this is not necessarily a bad thing. Every child is different, with different reading levels, interests, and levels of maturity. To say that only one style of book is good for children and should be read by children is to limit them and possibly foster bad connotations with reading.

    I know that this is not what Nodelman is advocating; rather he is attempting to point out that there is a lack of logic and consistency in these assumptions. I loved this book as a child and still love it now. Green Eggs and Ham gave me an opportunity to play with and enjoy reading at a level I was comfortable with at that time. It also encouraged me to try and make up my own rhymes and fantastic creatures. I know that I loved this book as a child and I still love it now. All of my boys loved it and my ten year old still takes it out sometimes just to have the fun of reading, listening, or playing with the rhymes.

    But the Lemony Snicket books clearly do not hold the listed assumptions as truth, instead presenting the strong, smart Baudelaire children to prove each generalization false. It opens with a death, features the children in uncomfortable and miserable situations, and describes only darkness and pain.

    The characters are not what one would expect either. Violet is a fourteen-year-old inventor, Klaus is twelve and a brilliant reader, and even the infant Sunny is very bright but has trouble saying what she means with only baby-talk. Adult characters are either evil geniuses or bumbling fools who refuse to take the orphans seriously. The Baudelaire orphans cannot turn to a trusted adult for help in their hardships; they must rely on their own intellect and cunning to save themselves.

    Indeed, it is the adults that they are most often fighting against. This is also quite uncommon. Usually, grown-ups are there to help and guide the children; it is still quite controversial for an adult to be portrayed in such a negative light. Furthermore, children are conventionally shown to need help and guidance, but here the Baudelaires prove themselves to be remarkably self-sufficient.

    The children are intelligent, eager to learn, and able to think about and react to the situation at hand. Another relatively uncommon feature of this book is that it is not didactic in any traditional sense. The adults in the story are certainly not role models, and they do not display behavior that a parent would wish their child to imitate. The children succeed because they are different from the adults, not because they have been assimilated into miniature versions of them. This is most readily shown when Mr. Poe can think is that he might be using words that are too big for them.

    But this is what the children are used to dealing with. And rather than struggling against a dragon or monster, they fight against the adults who try to take advantage of them. The Bad Beginning goes counter to every traditional assumption listed in the beginning of this paper. And yet, the Series of Unfortunate Events has become one of the most popular and highly-regarded series around.

    He is passing out book reports, showing his superiority by dressing in a suit and standing tall, requiring the sitting students, whose papers he just evaluated, to look up to him. The viewer then sees Cory putting on a clown nose and making silly faces. His behavior is quite a contradiction to the composed and dignified teacher in the scene, leaving the audience with an impression that adults are more perfect than children. As Mr. Feeney continues to pass out the book reports he congratulates a student, named Rick, for his efforts.

    He is no longer smiling and appears confused. Still wearing the clown nose, Cory tells Mr. Feeney, who unlike Cory, is very collected in his appearance, thoughts, and behavior informs Cory that Rick worked hard for his C and Mr. Feeney respects him for it. The teacher then looks down at Cory still wearing his large red foam nose and suggests that he not waste his time being the class clown.

    He then contradicts himself, by looking at the test, because he wants Mr. Feeney to think that he is a genius. His mom and younger sister, Morgan, are discussing when Morgan can get a Halloween costume. The mom tells Morgan that she is very busy with work but that Eric, the oldest son, will take her shopping.

    Morgan becomes impatient and again announces her desire for a Halloween costume. Eric agrees to help but can not do it unassisted. He still needs his mom to take them to the store and his dad, when he gets off from work, to then pick them up. Morgan returns home with a costume of a Zombie. She looks at Eric, giving blame to her older son, and announces that she wanted Morgan to pick out her own costume.

    This is giving the child agency and allowing her to express and expand her own imagination. She explains that Morgan picks out her own clothes because they like to give her freedom of expression. This is another example of interpellation, because whoever decided clothes have to match or what should be considered a match?

    It seems as though they are trying to protect her from the messages of disappointment that they are sending to their older son Eric. The director, in this scene, displays an agreement with the common assumption that children are innocent and need to be protected. Feeney congratulates him verbally but appears doubtful through his facial expressions. Cory is worried that Mr. Feeney knows he cheated and that he will tell his parents. He announces that he does not like lying to his parents. However, they fail to realize that it was their initial mistake that caused the adult to give the detention sentence.

    Dominic Lagan (Author of FALLEN ANGELS)

    He knows that adults assume that he is fallible and will love and take care of him despite his mistakes. The bell then rings and Mr. Feeney announces that he wants to talk to Cory. The student looks nervous and gets out of his seat slowly, as though he is about to meet his death. Cory looks as though he is going to be physically hurt, though he knows Mr. Feeney is only going to talk to him about his high IQ score. This quote also reinforces his admiration of adults because he is associating Mr.

    Feeney sits down with Cory and asks if there is anything he wants to share. He explains that Cory will be transferred to an advanced school where the school is committed to giving children all that they deserve. Cory is aware that his parents and teacher know that he cheated on the IQ test. Before finally admitting to his parents that he found the answers to the IQ test, Cory takes a second intelligence test.

    This test reveals that he has the IQ of an average sixth grader. It is this common assumption that adds to the adult-centeredness of the episode because adults like Mr. Feeney are portrayed with high intelligence, while the child is not corrected when calling himself a moron.

    At the end of the episode Cory tells his parents and teacher the truth; which gains him the respect he so desired from his teacher. The episode is didactic because Cory has learned that he should tell adults the truth and he should never cheat. He accepts the fact that he is inferior to adults, a point which I do not like about the episode, but a typical adult-centered characteristic. This positive portrayal of parents makes it impossible for the viewer to be mad at the adults for punishing Cory, especially since Cory realizes that he deserves punishment, and therefore, is not upset.

    The fairy tale, The Little Mermaid was story that I could not go to sleep without hearing. I was about six years old when I first heard this story and it allowed my imagination to meander into the world of mermaids. Whether I was at the beach swimming like a mermaid in the ocean or simply reading the story over and over, I was fascinated by the mermaid world under sea. I was nearly obsessed with mermaids and wished I could be one of them. This story created the magic in my imagination; however, as I read the story more and more, I came to see the practicality in it. Maybe I was convinced that there really were mermaids out there so the story became practical to me?

    To illustrate, The Little Mermaid portrays a young mermaid with these typical characteristics, but Andersen takes it a step further. The mermaids in each version of the story differ greatly, especially the reasons behind each mermaid's wish to go to land with the people. Andersen's mermaid wants to be a human being so she can have an eternal soul after she dies. She is driven to become a human. Their world seemed to her to be much larger than her own. Disney made The Little Mermaid a traditional fairy tale, because Andersen's ideas could not be translated into a modern cartoon that was socially accepted for children.

    So Disney used the classic battle between good and evil, which is typically understood everywhere, instead of the mermaid's battle within herself as Andersen wrote. In my mind, fairy tales represent the good conquering over the evil after a significant challenge. In contrast, Andersen displays the sea witch winning the battle. The little mermaid does not look back on her life under the sea, but looks forward to her chance to attain an eternal soul.

    Why would the sea witch say such a thing that might change the little mermaids mind about becoming a human? I assume that the reasons for this line may be to enforce the adult figure in the story. The sea witch is older; therefore, she is wise and guides the young mermaid. For example, Disney reveals the story to have a happy ending in that the little mermaid and the Prince marry. One could conceive the ending to have different meanings. The little mermaid had failed and evil had won. In the original Andersen story, The Little Mermaid , she does not marry the Prince, which is what seems to be what she should do.

    Still, she learned to love unconditionally, and did not turn into sea foam, as mermaids do. She ascended and obtained a human soul from entering the daughters of air. The daughters of air are portrayed to be a spiritual movement. When I read this story as a child, I can see why I related the daughters of air to heaven. Finally, by losing her life, she wins the hope of immortality because of her years of good deeds. It is almost like viewing death as a reward in this story because she in fact did win and gain her immortal soul.

    After reading the story at age nineteen, what really struck me was how the little mermaid did not get what she thought she wanted, but ended up with something much more important or valuable: her immortality. This means that they fit what we would assign to children right or not. This, among other terms, will be used to weigh through the book Giraffes? By Dr. Doris Haggis-On-Whey to assess how it relates to other books. It fits the look of an educational book. What I mean by this is that when I think of an educational book, I associate lots of photographs, small amounts of text simply to explain the background information or captions to pictures , and a particular layout for their pages.

    This vision of a particular educational book is founded in the strictly educational, typical case prototype books I used to read as I was younger; the Eyewitness book series used to be my absolute favorite book to read for the very same reasons listed above. They disguised learning to be fun and painless. To continue on, this book has a very similar layout to that series. Part of a series itself, the authors and designers purposely tried to model the visual presentation of an Eyewitness look in this satiric series, as to help create its ambiance.

    On every single page there is at least one photograph in which the surrounding text pertains. The diagrams or drawings are all clearly labeled, as well as the photographs, to keep things clear. Moreover, there is a pocket on the back inside cover of the book where they provide several activities to complete.

    Each diagram has a specific purpose; this purpose is to support the text, and bring it clarity. More importantly than the pictures or layout of the book, is the actual text. As mentioned earlier, at first glance the book looks like it set the standards for the typical case prototype book. When one reads the text, however, they are shocked from the lack of validity, completely crushing any thought of this book fitting the typical case prototype.

    I believe this is true, because the text of a book is far more important than the pictures. The book goes out of its way to make fun of all educational writing. Extreme athlete turned government operative Xander Cage returns in this action packed sequel. Scheduled for release in theatres in early Jackson and Tony Jaa.

    Christmas Inc. Location: Downtown Hamilton, Ancaster. Dark Matter Science fiction TV series. Fear Thy Neighbour A tv show that follows true crimes regarding conflicts between neighbours. Filth City A new crime comedy feature set in a fictional city following the power struggle between a hard-partying mayor, a misguided vigilante cop, and a former eco-terrorist.

    Hemlock Grove A TV series that chronicles the rise to power of Mary Queen of Scots when she arrives in France as a year-old, betrothed to Prince Francis, and with her four best friends as ladies-in-waiting. Location: Dundas, Downtown Hamilton. Human Town Location: Downtown Hamilton. Lemon Grove Location: East end. Location: Rural and conservation areas of Dundas, Ancaster and Flamborough. Second Time Around A drama about two seniors who meet and fall in love. Shimmer Lake A feature film. Location: Throughout the City. Sicilian Vampire Location: Various. Suicide Squad A feature film about a secret government agency that recruits imprisoned supervillains to execute dangerous black ops missions in exchange for clemency.

    The Bad Mother A dramatic comedy film about a woman who leaves her career to raise kids and gets caught in the battle of work versus family. Location: Small scene on the beach strip and a few scenes in the east end. A true story about how the Boston Globe uncovered a scandal that rocked the Catholic Church to its core. Skip to main content Skip to footer. Back to Filming in Hamilton. Other Services Available Music in Hamilton.

    Below are some highlights of productions that filmed here in Name of Production Synopsis Filming Location Stars Designated Survivor A low-level Cabinet member becomes President of the United States after a catastrophic attack kills everyone above him in the line of succession. When Dr. Sam Radford moves in next door to Grey House with his son, they are charmed by the 'magical' mother-daughter duo. We all have a superhero inside us, it just takes a bit of magic to bring it out. Luther Swann enters a world of horror when a virus is released in ice melting due to climate change.

    This disease transforms many into murderous predators who feed on human brain. Designated Survivor Kiefer Sutherland stars in this primetime drama where a low-ranking member of the Cabinet becomes President of the United States after a catastrophic attack kills everyone above him in the Presidential line of succession. Canadian real estate enthusiasts Pamela Gorrie, Sandi Ryan, and Steve Kowalyshyn Forbidden 3: Dying for Love A tv show that uses re-enactments and interviews with survivors to tell the true life stories of men and women who died because of their love for another.

    When their pasts coming back to haunt them, they will have to work hard to keep themselves, and their friends, alive. North End, Flamborough Hannah John-Kamen, Aaron Ashmore, Luke Macfarlane Lucky Day Red, a safe cracker who has just been released from prison, is trying to hold his family together as his past catches up with him in the form of Luc, a psychopathic contract killer who's seeking revenge for the death of his brother. American Gods Based on the award winning novel by Neil Gaiman, American Gods, follows Shadow, a recently released ex-convict, who meets a mysterious man who calls himself Mr.

    Location: Westover Road, Flamborough. Dark Matter A TV series that follows the six person crew of a derelict spaceship that awakens from stasis in the farthest reaches of space. Leads: Catherine Bell and Adrian Holmes. Location: East Mountain? Hamilton Aviary Scottish Rite. Location: Lower Burlington Street East. Leads: Vin Diesel, Samuel L. Leads: Tom Hiddleston, Charlie Hunnam. Location: Downtown core, Waterfront, North end.